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. The Rim Fire blazes in tree crowns of the Stanislaus National Forest, California, in late August, 2013.  Photo by Mike McMillan, USFS.
The California Rim Fire one year later: a natural experiment in fire ecology and management
Thursday, July 31, 2014

The 2013 California Rim Fire crossed management boundaries when it burned beyond the Stanislaus National Forest into to Yosemite National Park, providing a natural demonstration of the effects of a history of fire suppression on wildfire dynamics.

ESA
American River Parkway morning photo by Robert Course-Baker
2014 Earth Stewardship Initiative Demonstration Project: sustaining and enhancing Earth’s life-support systems
Tuesday, July 29, 2014

“Cities that Work for People and Ecosystems” is the theme for a full week of demonstration projects in the Sacramento’s American River Parkway during the annual meeting.

ESA
Stone Lakes National Wildlife Refuge.   Oct. 2010. Photo, Justine Belson/ USFWS.
Stewardship of fire ecology by native Californian cultures
Friday, July 18, 2014
Before the colonial era, 100,000s of people lived on the land now called California, and many of their cultures manipulated fire to control the availability of plants they used for food, fuel, tools, and ritual. Contemporary tribes continue to use fire to maintain desired habitat and natural resources.

ESA
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California State Senator Darrell Steinberg named as ESA Regional Policy Award winner
Wednesday, July 16, 2014
ESA’s Regional Policy Award recognizes an elected or appointed local policymaker who has an outstanding record of informing policy decisions with ecological science.

ESA
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Ecological Society of America announces 2014 award recipients
Tuesdsay, July 15, 2014
Ten awards recognizing outstanding contributions to ecology in new discoveries, teaching, sustainability, diversity, and lifelong commitment to the profession to be presented during the Society’s 99th Annual Meeting.

ESA
A lovely Augochlora pura extends half of its tongue. A. pura is a member of the relatively short-tongued Halictidae family, uprettily known as the sweat bees. The small, solitary bee is one of the most common bees of forests and forest edges in the eastern United States, and a promiscuous attendant to many flower species. Collected by Phillip Moore in Polk County, Tennessee. Photograph by Phillip Moore. Photo courtesy of the USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab.
For bees (and flowers), tongue size matters
Monday, July 14, 2014
When it comes to bee tongues, length is proportional to the size of the bee, but heritage sets the proportion. Estimating this hard to measure trait helps scientists understand bee species’ resiliency to change.

ESA
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Ecologists converge on Sacramento, Cal. for the Annual Meeting of the Ecological Society of America August 10-15, 2014
Monday, June 16, 2014
ESA’s 99th Annual Meeting features public sessions bringing research into the realms of policy and planning, touching on California coastal resources, organic farming, disease, and wildlife in urban spaces.

ESA
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