Research site networks

USDA Forest Service Experimental Forests & Ranges and Research Natural Areas As an early career ecologist, securing funds for new, field-based studies can be challenging.  One strategy is to collaborate on existing studies.  This type of collaboration is cost efficient because study establishment is already completed, allowing collaboration to focus on continuing the original objectives Read more about Research site networks[…]

Team science techniques for highly effective teams

Ecology is becoming an increasingly collaborative science, as seen in part by the increasing number of authors on ecology publications. As an early career ecologist, you’ve probably already worked in at least a few, and maybe many, collaborative research teams, whether your collaborators came from within your lab group, or institutions around the world. You’ve Read more about Team science techniques for highly effective teams[…]

Early career ecologists, why engage with the corporate sector?

I was first exposed to the notion of corporate engagement when I read a New Yorker piece that featured interviews with Peter Kareiva and Mark Tercek.  Peter is former Chief Scientist at The Nature Conservancy (TNC) and Mark is a former executive at Goldman Sachs and now CEO of TNC.  TNC and other big conservation Read more about Early career ecologists, why engage with the corporate sector?[…]

Photo by C. Kern

Get more from data & share!

Data and publishing Data publication has been a new endeavor for me and was not addressed during my training in graduate school.  I have my first data publication out (Roberts et al. 2016) and have more in-progress.  Given my recent look into this, I thought it would be worth posting this topic to prompt further Read more about Get more from data & share![…]

Photo Credit: Chris Sanderson

Reflections of a white, male, European researcher on unconscious gender biases in academia

or “Who the hell am I to talk about this issue, anyways?!” Late last year, I was asked to write a blog for the Early Career Ecologist Section of the ESA, and I initially chose to focus it on a rather controversial topic: gender bias in academia. Now, the truth is that I’ve been a Read more about Reflections of a white, male, European researcher on unconscious gender biases in academia[…]

Photo credit: USDA Forest Service

Stuff I tell early career scientists

My name is Eric Gustafson and I am a landscape ecologist who specializes in forest landscape simulation modeling, particularly with the LANDIS-II model (http://www.landis-ii.org/).  I received my PhD from Purdue University in 1992, and have been a Research Ecologist for the Northern Research Station of the U.S. Forest Service since then.  I am tempted to Read more about Stuff I tell early career scientists[…]

Photo credit: Marilyn Jordan

Navigating the pre-tenure years

Lessons learned so far I am just a couple of days away from starting my second semester as an Assistant Professor, and it seems like a good time to reflect on what I’ve learned so far. First, a brief background. I received a PhD in Ecology and Evolution from Stony Brook University in April 2014. Read more about Navigating the pre-tenure years[…]

Interdisciplinary Research in Ecology [announcement]

This is a guest announcement from Dennis Tarasi, a PhD Candidate in the Peet Lab at UNC-Chapel Hill*
What is interdisciplinary research? What is the future of interdisciplinary research in ecology?
Interdisciplinary research is one of the most commonly used catchphrases in the field of ecology and broader science in general. This term has been used (and misused) so much that its definition has become very ambiguous and context-dependent. Ecologists generally embrace the importance of interdisciplinary work, but their vision and application varies drastically.

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